DALHOFF THOMAS participates in Sustainability Lecture Series

Henry Minor and Sam Henry provides an overview to the LID competition.

Henry Minor and Sam Henry provides an overview to the LID competition.

One of our constant goals at Dalhoff Thomas design is to educate and inspire students, clients, and the public about the environmental principles we use during our site design and land planning process. It is always an enriching experience to discuss these ideals with allied professionals and the general public, and yesterday Sam Henry and Henry Minor  were asked to take part in a Sustainability Lecture Series at the University of Memphis.  The lecture series focuses on sustainability in architecture and collaborating professions such as planning, landscape architecture, and interior design.  

One of our constant goals at Dalhoff Thomas design is to educate and inspire students, clients, and the public about the environmental principles we use during our site design and land planning process.

The emphasis of the lecture was on sustainable site design, green infrastructure, and the Low Impact Development (LID) competition that DT design recently won. Although many people are familiar with the term sustainability, far fewer understand the issues caused by the predominant method of handling storm water with grey infrastructure. The DT Design team explained that green infrastructure is designing storm water systems to mimic natural processes of managing stormwater with vegetation and soil media. We must change our techniques of storm water management in order to reverse the trend of polluted waterways throughout our state and the country. A great resource for more information about green infrastructure is the ASLA Guide to Green Infrastructure.

Scale model of the LID competition site and site plan as designed by DT.  Model built by UM Architecture students. 

Scale model of the LID competition site and site plan as designed by DT.  Model built by UM Architecture students. 

The architecture and interior design students were recently tasked with taking Dalhoff Thomas' site plan from the LID competition and designing the senior housing units and the clubhouse.  Students even built a scale model of the developed site as planned by the DT team to study relationships between the natural environment and the proposed built environment. The DT Design team answered several specific questions about the intent of our design and had a roundtable discussion about various green infrastructure techniques and maintenance that is required to keep them operational.

A thank you goes to Jenna Thompson, Sustainability Coordinator at the Department of Architecture, for inviting the Dalhoff Thomas team to present and discuss these critical low impact development principles. Educating the public and future professionals is a joy for our team and something we all must do more consistently in order for to bring about significant change to the development sector.